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December 19

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Growth Tip #10: The Handwritten Thank You Letter

By Pete Rakozy

Growth Tips

Aside from getting customers, the next most important task as a business is to KEEP customers. If that’s your challenge, this tip is for you.
 
What’s one thing you look at every day no matter what? Physical mail?
 
We all review and sort our physical mail into junk, read, and whatever piles (paper mache stash?). With digital messages we do the same, but often in bulk. We batch mark emails “read” or “archived” without even looking at them. We skim text messages. All in all, we are just sorting through the bombardment of incoming messages to identify what’s important and what’s not.
 
You must do something that communicates you care about and value your customer.
 
Texting “Thank you” takes zero effort, and therefore means almost zero to our customers (and they probably assume it’s a robot or AI doing this for them). BUT, sitting down and handwriting a letter takes time, thought, and postage. It communicates, “I care enough about you as a person to take five minutes out of my business schedule to convey my gratitude in an inconvenient way. That’s how much your business means to me.”

Accompany that with the Free T-Shirt Growth Tip, and you’ve just won your way into your customers’ hearts in a way that no email, text, or post ever could.

How to execute this growth tip

1.

When your business is small, you can personalize each note to each client, but as you grow, you'll need a scalable process that maintains that personal touch. 


Craft a few templates that you will use or hand off to others for the thank you note. This maintains consistency in your communication to all clients.


You don't want one person saying "Muchas Gracias" and another saying "Thanks dude, you're totally rad," if neither of those are what you or your brand would actually say. Do build in some spots to personalize it.

2.

Operations time. Map out step-by-step the process for sending the letter.


Don't skip this step. As you grow, this will be one less process you have to worry about.


Map out what triggers sending a thank you letter, the paper and envelope used, the stamps, etc.


Being extra detailed here in your documentation allows you to hand this off to an assistant or freelancer to do it for you.


Pro Tip: Build this right into your onboarding process checklist and you'll never have to worry about it again.

3.

Create a list of clients/customers, and start sending thank you cards!


Pro Tip: If you happen to have an assistant or someone you can delegate to that you trust, write out the alphabet for them in upper and lower case and give it to them to use. They can write the letter with your handwriting (after some practice), so even though the letter isn't from you, it's your words and "your" handwriting. Bryan Miles, Founder of BELAY, a company that provides amazing virtual assistants, does this with his assistant.


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About Pete Rakozy

Wisconsin farm boy through and through moved to the "big" city of Eagle Mountain, Utah to help businesses break free of their reliance on marketing agencies by building their own quality internal marketing team that doesn't cost them an arm and a leg.

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